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Uinta Mountain Lakes & Reservoirs


Scroll down to the bottom of the page for an interactive map of the Uintas with lakes marked on it.

Bonnie Lake
Bonnie Lake
Brook Lake
Brook Lake
Butterfly Lake
Butterfly Lake
Chepeta Lake
Chepeta Lake
Cirque Lake (Fox/Queant Pass)
Cirque Lake (Fox/Queant Pass)
Cleveland Lake
Cleveland Lake
Crescent Lake
Crescent Lake
Crystal Lake
Crystal Lake
Dime Lake
Dime Lake
Divide Lake
Divide Lake
Elbow Lake
Elbow Lake
Fish Lake
Fish Lake
Fox Lake
Fox Lake
Grandaddy Lake
Grandaddy Lake
Island Lake
Island Lake
Lilipad Lake
Lilipad Lake
Kidney Lakes
Kidney Lakes
Mirror Lake
Mirror Lake
Moon Lake
Moon Lake
Ogden Lake
Ogden Lake
Queant Lake
Queant Lake
Rainbow Lake
Rainbow Lake
Reader Lakes
Reader Lakes
Sharlee Lake
Sharlee Lake
Spirit Lake
Spirit Lake
Taylor Lake
Taylor Lake
Trial Lake
Trial Lake
Twin Lakes
Twin Lakes
Upper Stillwater
Upper Stillwater
Wall Lake
Wall Lake
Washington Lake
Washington Lake
High Uinta Lakes

The following fish species can be found in the High Uintas:

There are well over 1,000 natural lakes in the Uintas. More than 500 of those pristine mountain lakes support populations of game fish. There are also over 400 miles of streams. The Utah DWR has published a series of booklets called "Lakes of the High Uintas" that are also extremely valuable. This is a 10-booklet set that describes all waters managed as fisheries. The booklets provide hiking directions and describe fishing opportunities, along with details about camping, spring water and horse feed. They also include maps of specific drainages. Contact the DWR for more information.

The Uinta Mountains receive about 40 inches of precipitation annually, mostly as snow. The growing season is very short, and fish do not have much time during the summer to feed before ice forms on the lakes again. Temperatures in areas above 10,000 feet are rarely above 80 degrees even during warm summer days. Night temperatures during summer are 30-40 degrees, with freezing possible at any time of year. Often, thunderstorms appear with little warning, usually in the early afternoon.

Most of the mountain slopes are forested. Coniferous trees (lodge pole pine, Engelmann spruce, Douglas fir, sub-alpine fir) grow in large continuous stands. Quaking aspen occur in scattered patches throughout most of the lower elevations. Isolated meadows - resembling large parks - and willow fields add variety to the timbered areas. Many peaks extend their bald heads above tree line.

Access to Uinta Lakes depends on where you want to go. Some lakes can be driven to, especially along Hwy 150. Others require dayhikes or backpacking to get to. Horseback is another way to get to remote high elevation lakes. Whatever you do, bring the mosquito repellant to avoid becoming dinner for hungry swarms of mosquitos!

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