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Conference on future of Weber River


Ogden River
The Ogden River is one of the gems of the Weber River watershed.
Photo by Ben Nadolski.

"Confluence 2014" happens Nov. 1718

OGDEN It's a puzzling picture: as the population in northern Utah grows, so does the demand on its water. That includes the water in the Weber River and its many tributary streams.

The Ogden River is one of the gems of the Weber River watershed.

The Ogden River is one of the gems of the Weber River watershed.

How can a finite resource a river of water meet the needs of a growing human population? In the future, will enough water be available to meet the needs of those who live, work and play in the watershed, including farmers, anglers and others?

The inaugural Weber River watershed symposium "Confluence 2014" will seek answers to those questions. The symposium will bring competing interests together to discuss problems and find collaborative solutions.

Ogden City Mayor Mike Caldwell will give the keynote address. Presenters and panelists include the heads of various Utah state government departments and Alan Matheson, senior environmental advisor to Gov. Gary Herbert.

The conference will be held Nov. 17 and 18 at the Ben Lomond Suites Historic Hotel in Ogden. If you're interested in the future of the Weber River, you're encouraged to attend. You can learn more about the conference, and register to attend, at www.weberconfluence2014.eventbrite.com.

Ben Nadolski, river restoration biologist for the Division of Wildlife Resources and one of the event's organizers, says he helped organize the symposium to bring those who have an interest in the future of the Weber River together.

"We want to highlight and strengthen the recent partnerships we've built throughout the Weber River watershed and discuss ways that we can move forward - together - into the future," Nadolski says. "We invite watershed professionals, local leaders and citizens who live, work and play in the area to attend so we can stimulate further conversations about the future of our watershed."